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Exercise 1

1. Greetings, farewells and good manners

Greetings, farewells and good manners are very common expressions in everyday speech, so they are very useful to be able to establish good communication with English speakers.

2. Types of greetings, farewells and good manners in English

  • GREETINGS

    These are expressions that you say when you meet someone.

    GREETINGS USE
    Hello   You use it when you meet people or start talking to someone. 
    Hi   The same as "hello" but it's more colloquial.
    How are you?   Friendly greeting you use when you meet soneone you know.
    Welcome   Used to greet people in a warm and inviting way.
    Good morning   Can be used instead of hello in the morning (5:00 to 12:00)
    Good afternoon   Can be used instead of hello in the afternoon.
    (12.00 to 18.00)
    Good evening   Can be used instead of hello in the evening (after 18.00)
    Hello, Joss!
    Good morning, Martha! How are you?
    Fine, thanks.
  • FAREWELLS

    They are expressions used to say goodbye to people.

    FAREWELLS USE
    Goodbye   A word you say when you leave someone or someone leaves you.
    Bye   The same as "goodbye" but it's more colloquial.
    Have a nice day   Used to express good wishes when you say goodbye.
    Have a good weekend   Used to express you wish another person to enjoy the weekend.
    Good night   Used to say goodbye in the evening or at night or before going to bed.  
    See you later   Used to say goodbye to someone you expect to see again soon.
    Good night is only used to say goodbye when you know you are not going to see the person/people again that evening.
    Good night, dad.
    Good night, son.
    Bye, Bryan.
    Goodbye, have a nice day!
    Thank you, see you later!
  • POLITE SENTENCES

    These are expressions used to treat people politely and with courtesy.

    POLITE SENTENCES USE
    Please   A word you say when you want to make a request
    or ask a question in a polite way.
    Thank you   Used to tell someone you are grateful for what they  
    have said or done.    
    Thank you very much   The same as "thank you" but with greater emphasis.
    You're welcome   A possible reply to "thank you".
    Do you need help?
    Yes, please. I have to cut the onions.
    I can help you.
    Thank you.
    You're welcome.
    We can also use welcome to greet someone that has just arrived.
    - Welcome to the circus!
    - Welcome aboard!
    POLITE SENTENCES USE
    Sorry   Used when you want to apologize for something you have said 
    or done.
    No problem   A reply you use when somone says "sorry".
    Don't worry about it   Another reply to "sorry".
    - Sorry for the wait. The bus was late.
    - Don't worry about it.
    POLITE SENTENCES USE
    Excuse me   Used when you want to catch someone's attention   
    or to interrupt politely.
    - Excuse me, do you know where the cathedral is?
    - It's in front of you!
    - Excuse me, teacher. I have a question.
    - What is your question?
    POLITE SENTENCES USE
    You too   Used to answer to someone's general good wishes.       
    The same to you   Used to answer to someone's general good wishes.     
    - Have a nice weekend!
    - The same to you.
  • COURTESY TITLES
    They are ways to address people according to their social or marital status. 
    English USE
    Mr.   Used in front of the surname or full name of a male person
    whether he is married or not.
    Miss   Used in front of the surname or full name of an unmarried female.
    Mrs.   Used in front of the surname or full name of a married female.
    Ms.   Used in front of the surname or full name of a female
    whether she is married or not.
    Good morning, Mrs. Waters, can I help you?
    Yes, please. Do you know where my husband, Mr. Waters, is?
    Yes, he's waiting for you to have breakfast.
    It is also common to use Miss to address a female teacher and Mr. to male teachers.

     


    - I want to do the exam again, Miss Carol.
    - No, you can't.
    Definition English USE

    Courtesy titles basedon nobility

    Sir  

    Used before the name of a manwho is a knight or a baronet.

    Lady (+ name)  

    Used before the name of a womanof high social rank.

    - You've got a beautiful palace, Lady Elizabeth.
    - I know, Sir Robert.

    Sir is a treatment used to refer to men and madam to refer to women in a formal way.

    Excuse me sir, where is the bank?
    What would you like to drink, madam?

Remember!

Greetings, farewells and good manners are expressions that are used a lot in everyday life and are therefore very useful for establishing a good conversation in English.
GREETINGS
Hello
Hi
How are you?
Welcome
Good morning
Good afternoon
Good evening
FAREWELLS
Bye
Good bye
Have a nice day
Have a good weekend
Good night
See you later
POLITE SENTENCES
Please
Thank you
Thank you very much
You're welcome
Sorry
No problem
Don't worry about it
Excuse me
You too
The same to you
COURTESY TITLES
Mr.
Miss
Mrs.
Sir
Lady
Madam

 

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