AppStore

Download our 100% free app

Find everything you need to learn English

Quite, rather, fairly y pretty

Quantifiers

1. Intensifers quite, rather, fairly and pretty

Intensifiers quite, fairly, rather and pretty are used to vary the intensity of the adjective, adverb, noun or verb they accompany.
This Street is quite steep.
It's a rather unfair situation.

2. How to use quite, rather, fairly and pretty

Quite, rather, fairly and pretty are used depending on the degree of intensity we want to express. They modify mainly adjectives and adverbs.

Intensifier Use Example

Rather
More than
a little but
less than very

It is used to give intensity to a negative idea. This chair is rather uncomfortable.
It can be used to express a positive idea when it's surprising. His idea is rather interesting. I'm surprised.
It can modify verbs that express feelings or thoughts.  I rather think he should have admitted his mistake.
When it modifies a noun, we put the article after rather. It was rather a disappointment.
If the noun is preceded by an adjective, the article can be placed before or after rather. He is a rather / rather a bad actor.

Quite
Very but
not extremely

It is used to give intensity to a positive idea. This new app is quite good.
It can modify verbs to express opinions or preferences. The most commonly used verbs are: like, enjoy, understand, agree... I quite like her new designs.
It is used with the particles a bit, a few and a lot to express a larger quantity. Quite a few people attended the seminar.
When it modifies a noun whether or not it is preceded by an adjective, the accompanying article is placed after quite. He's going through quite a difficult situation.
We can use the expression not quite when we want to express not completely. I think she's a nurse, but I'm not quite sure.
With adjectives like: certain, obvious, right, impossible, sure, clear..., it means completely, totally. I'm quite certain that this project will be a success.

Pretty
More than
a little

It is used in informal contexts. It is not used in negative sentences. I'm pretty tired. I don't think I'm going out tonight.
When it modifies a noun preceded by an adjective, the article is placed before pretty. It's been a pretty hectic week.

Fairly
More than
a little but
much less
than very

It expresses less intensity than rather, quite and pretty. He plays golf fairly well.
When it modifies a noun preceded by an adjective, the article is placed before fairly. It's a fairly common mistake.

Remember!

Intensifiers quite, fairly, rather and pretty are used to vary the intensity of the adjective, adverb, noun or verb they accompany.
Intensifier Examples
Rather It looks like he's been rather stressed out lately.
Quite We are quite happy with the ratings we are getting.
Pretty I'm pretty used to being criticized.
Fairly We have barbecues fairly often.

 

Share: